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INTRODUCTION   |   BIOGRAPHY   |   GALLERY I - PAINTINGS   |   GALLERY II -WATERCOLORS   |   GALLERY III - DRAWINGS   |   THE DREAM  ROOM   |   CONTRIBUTIONS TO ART   |   SCULPTURES   |   EXHIBITIONS   |   BOOKS   |   ART FOR SALE   |   NEWS   |   FORGERIES ATTRIBUTED TO LEONORA CARRINGTON   |   LINKS   |   CONTACT US
INTRODUCTION


Developed by the literary and artistic movement of the 20th Century . The surrealist movement of visual art and literature, flourished in Europe between World Wars I and II. Surrealism grew principally out of the earlier Dada movement, which before World War I produced works of anti-art that deliberately defied reason; but Surrealism emphasis was not on negation but on positive expression. The movement represented a reaction against what its members saw as the destruction wrought by the "rationalism" that had guided European culture and politics in the past and had culminated in the horrors of World War I. According to the major spokesman of the movement, the poet and critic André Breton, who published "The Surrealist Manifesto" in 1924, Surrealism was a means of reuniting conscious and unconscious realms of experience so completely, that the world of dream and fantasy would be joined to the everyday rational world in "an absolute reality, a surreality." Drawing heavily on theories adapted from Sigmund Freud, Breton saw the unconscious as the wellspring of the imagination. He defined genius in terms of accessibility to this normally untapped realm, which, he believed, could be attained by poets and painters alike. This movement continues to flourish at all ends of the earth. Continued thought processes and investigations into the mind produce today some of the best art ever seen.

Surrealism, is a movement in visual art and literature, flourishing in Europe between World Wars I and II. Surrealism grew principally out of the earlier Dada movement, which before World War I produced works of anti-art that deliberately defied reason; but Surrealism's emphasis was not on negation but on positive expression. The movement represented a reaction against what its members saw as the destruction wrought by the "rationalism" that had guided European culture and politics in the past and that had culminated in the horrors of World War I. According to the major spokesman of the movement, the poet and critic André Breton, who published "The Surrealist Manifesto" in 1924, Surrealism was a means of reuniting conscious and unconscious realms of experience so completely that the world of dream and fantasy would be joined to the everyday rational world in "an absolute reality, a surreality." Drawing heavily on theories adapted from Sigmund Freud, Breton saw the unconscious as the wellspring of the imagination. He defined genius in terms of accessibility to this normally untapped realm, which, he believed, could be attained by poets and painters alike.

The major Surrealist painters are Jean Arp, Max Ernst, Leonora Carrington, André Masson, René Magritte, Yves Tanguy, Salvador Dalí, Pierre Roy, Paul Delvaux, and Joan Miró. With its emphasis on content and free form, Surrealism provided a major alternative to the contemporary, highly formalistic Cubist movement and was largely responsible for perpetuating in modern painting the traditional emphasis on content.

Pablo Weisz-Carrington, inspired by this movement and by the influence of his mother, the great painter Leonora Carrington, adopted Surrealism as his guide and way of transmitting his emotions in the plastic arts.

We are proud to present to you in this Official Website the art, talent and inspiration of a great artist of our times:

PABLO WEISZ-CARRINGTON




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